A New Study Suggests Drinking Could Help You Live Longer

A recent presentation at the meeting for the American Association for the Advancement of Science could prove to be a game-changer for people who are looking for convenient theories that encourage their lifestyles choices (*ahem* ME). According to Neurologist Claudia Kawas and her team at the University of California, there is a link between moderate drinking and people who live into their 90s.

Kawas has spent the last 14 years studying the lifestyle habits of 1,700 people between the ages of 90-99. Kawas had apparently been frustrated with all of the inconclusive research about lifespan, and made a point of delving into the various factors which could have an effect on human longevity. One of these factors was alcohol consumption.

According to Kawas, her results indicated that moderate drinking decreased risk of premature death by 18%, according to The Independent.

However, it’s important to note that these results do not show causation, only correlation. “I have no explanation for it, but I do firmly believe that modest drinking improves longevity,” Kawas stated.

Though several sensationalized studies have reported similar findings, most of the research on this front has been conflicting. The American Society of Clinical Oncology published a study in November of last year which cautioned that even small amounts of alcohol increased the chances of developing breast, colon, esophageal, larynx and oral cancers.

In all likelihood, the link between drinking and living longer is tenuous at best — it’s more probable that the elderly people in Kawas’ study maintained their health thanks to genetics and other lifestyle choices.

However, the study is somewhat reassuring if you were looking for an excuse to have a single glass of wine with dinner tonight.

Originally published on pizzabottle

Featured Image via WeHeartIt

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.