7 Things I Want My Little Brother To Know Before He Goes To College

If I told my brother the same things I was told before going into college, people would probably think I was giving him strange advice.

The first pre-college “gift” I received was a rape whistle (it was from my little brother). While it was a practical gift, it was also weird – it essentially told me that the first thing I should know about college was that it was a dangerous place for me to be. For the record, I never once used that rape whistle (or the variety of other anti-rape products I received during my years in college). I didn’t even take it out of the package. I went to a small liberal arts college and I never really felt unsafe. While I’m not by any means claiming that my college was perfectly safe (as the many sexual assault victims at my school could tell you), I just never feared for my safety personally.

Thinking about it now, I may have never even opened the rape whistle, but I also didn’t get rid of it. Why? Because it seemed like something I could need at some point. It’s still sitting in a drawer, in the living room of in my apartment in New York City, untouched. But if I had given my brother a rape whistle last Christmas, as I considered doing, it would probably also remain in the package. Only it would probably sit in his desk at home, or the back of some closet – he wouldn’t bring it with him to college. He would probably forget about it and that would be fine.

When my best friend, a guy, started college, his dad sent him a box of condoms. Again, a practical gift, but the message my friend received at the start of his college career was that college would be the time to have sex. We essentially received the exact opposite messages: I learned that I should be vigilant about unwanted sexual advances and he learned that society expected him to have sex. More basically put, men should seek sex, while women should fear it.

So, I want to change the message. My brother, almost eighteen years old and a high school senior, is getting ready to embark on the “best four years of his life” (although that description of college is debatable). But as a feminist, a college graduate, and most importantly his sister, I have some advice of my own for my little bro.

  1. Be yourself.

When I got to college, I wanted to reinvent myself. I thought I could make myself into someone who was completely different from the person I was in high school (aka cooler, friends with more “popular” people, invited to the best parties, etc.). That didn’t happen, and I’m so glad it didn’t. Just be you; don’t worry too much about what everyone else thinks.

2. Be someone people can count on.

Stick up for what you believe in, stand up for your friends, and stay strong. Follow through on promises you make and always be dependable.

3. All that peer pressure stuff.

Don’t give in to peer pressure and don’t pressure anyone to do anything they don’t want to do. Whether it’s drinking, drugs, or anything sexual, don’t do anything you aren’t comfortable with (and don’t make anyone else feel uncomfortable).

4. Listen to your friends.

If your friends tell you something is wrong, listen to them. Don’t discount them. Especially your female friends – if they talk to you about being catcalled, or someone making them uncomfortable, or anyone taking advantage of them – listen. Believe them. Be there for them.

5. Don’t rape.

Not that I believe you ever would, but for the number of times I was told how to not get raped, I think it’s fair that I tell you once how not to rape: If someone says no (or does not say yes) to your sexual advances, stop.

6. Don’t let your friends rape or be raped.

If you see a friend taking advantage of someone else or being taken advantage of by someone else, step in. Don’t be a bystander. Do something – it’s always better to have a friend be mad at you for a day for “cock-blocking” than to have someone be traumatized for life by a sexual assault.

7. Be the feminist I know you are.

Don’t shy away from the term “feminist” because of the negative stigma that is still associated with it. Think about all the strong women you know and remember that we are only this strong because of other women and men who aren’t afraid to call themselves feminists.

You’re an amazing little brother and one of the best men I know. I can’t wait to see you take college by storm. Congrats on being an almost high school graduate!

Love You Always,
Your Big Sister

Featured Image via Kaszja Z Mlekiem

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